EE Balloons To Bring Travelling GSM Mobile Booster Style Coverage

With the importance of cellular coverage these days, things like a GSM Mobile Booster, like the GSM Mobile Booster Nikrans MA-130 are becoming more and more appealing. In the UK, a fleet of blimps are set to do their jobs, bringing both mobile and wireless broadband coverage to the far-flung rural communities.

The UK mobile operator EE, who operates the fleet, to provide remote communities with voice and data services, even if coverage is lost due to circumstances, such as natural disasters such as flooding, or the like. EE expects to launch its first ‘helikite’, a mobile broadcast site, which is held up and tethered to helium balloons, sometime in the latter half of 2017.

The operator is also aiming to use drones for the similar purpose, though they say that that particular project is not prepared for launch.

The balloons, as well as the soon-to-follow drones, will beam mobile signals to the areas below them, allowing communities to connect with phones and internet even if the traditional mobile phone mast system goes down, or requires additional capacity due to high traffic, similar to how one uses a GSM Mobile Booster Nikrans MA-130, or the like.

Chief Executive for EE, Marc Allera, said that the balloons and the drones could not only be used to provide coverage to the rural areas of the UK, but also boost coverage at major events and venues, such as stadiums or sport events, where people have issue connecting to networks.

EE, however, says that airspace regulations could make using them at sports events and music festivals problematic.

The company says that these new technologies are best suited for ensuring coverage in the circumstance of natural disasters and catastrophic events, due to their capabilities to stay airborne for a month and signal radius of 5km.

The balloons are more weather-resistant compared to the drones, although the company states that lightning strikes are still a danger. The drones, however, due to their shorter duration and weaker signal range, making them better suited for shorter term use, like search and rescue operations.

Similar balloons and drones are being seen by companies like Google and Facebook as a cheap solution to providing coverage to hard to reach areas, with the latter investing in Project Loon, which sends balloons up to the edge of the atmosphere to beam internet signal to areas below it.