Category Archives: School

Hundreds Of Public Schools Display Themselves In Victoria As Protest Against Funding Cuts

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Getting high school furniture and running an institution costs a lot of money, which is why the Morrison Government’s $256 million cut to public school funding in South Australia has received a lot of flak. In response, public schools in the region took over Victoria Square/Tarntanyangga.

Hundreds of public schools from the region were on display on the square’s lawn, as part of the Fair Funding Now! campaign, not only to counter the funding cuts, as well as to secure additional funding for public schools. Alongside the pubic rally, the Fair Funding Now! mobile billboard campaign is also being launched in Booth by, with the mobile billboard set to roam across Adelaide, with the aim of informing the community the importance of getting proper funding for local public schools, to ensure quality education, and to get resources like primary and high school furniture, among others.

According to the Australian Education Union Federal President, Correna Haythorpe, the people in South Australia were vexed that the Morrison Government was skimping on public school funding, with parents, teachers and voters alike making their disappointment on the government’s decision to cut $256 million from public school funding clear.

After six years, Ms. Haythorpe says, the Federal Coalition has made it very clear that they don’t support public schools. Reportedly, the government’s plan would drop all the public schools in the South Australia region below the national resource standard, every last one. This means that none of them would have the funding to meet the needs of students for the next half-decade, at the minimum.

AEU South Australia Branch President Howard Spread bury says that recent polls have stated that the majority of voters consider public school funding to be a key issue for them for election, with more than two-thirds saying that greater investment in the local public education facilities is a better investment  for federal funding than tax cuts for high income earners.

He notes that this is a clear rebuttal of the Morrison Government’s cuts to public school funding by their electorate.  They have made it clear what they want; a government that takes funding public schools seriously.

What To Know About An International School In Bangkok?

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In Thailand, there are so many popular international schools for expats and their kids. You may want to enroll your child in a nursery school, primary and secondary schools for older children. The right international school in Bangkok will prepare the child for an International Baccalaureate and other accreditations. There are schools that follow the American, British or Canadian curricula with English-speaking programmes, while others follow Mandarin, French or German language and system.

Education in Thailand

If the child has a Thai parent, then he’s considered a Thai citizen, and thus can attend a Thai school. Expats’ children are not permitted in schools offering the public system. The Thai school system is managed by the Thai Ministry of Education. Basic education runs six years of primary education and six years of secondary or high school education. Kindergartens, preschools and play groups are also available for young kids. Once all levels are completed, the child needs to take and pass the National Education Test to finish his programme.

International Schools in Thailand

If you’re an expat working in Thailand, you can send your child to an international school in Bangkok for their education. In Thailand’s international school system, they come in three tiers, with the first tier being the best and most expensive. The second tier have their tuition fees slightly reduced to be affordable to those on a budget. The third tier is suited for the affluent Thai families rather than expats. The curricula offered in these schools are approved by the Thai Ministry of Education.

If you want to enrol your child in an international school in Bangkok, he must possess a passport at least six months before expiry; non-immigrant EDT visa; all records from the previous school where the child attended; birth and health certificate; and immunisation records.

The admission and enrolment process can vary from each school. Tuition fees can really be expensive but there is a high-quality of learning, fewer students in classrooms, first rate facilities and extracurricular activities. Some international schools offer boarding facilities; however, classes are open during daytime.

So, look around for international schools in Bangkok that make your children learn and love their education, especially that it’s the foundation for their future.