Category Archives: Map

How An Aerial View Map Can Help In Landscaping Properties

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An aerial view map can provide a significant detail. They offer a better view than satellite imagery and are considered important for lawn and landscape companies to design the features of a home or business property. Other small businesses like roofing, paving, pooling and solar companies are rapidly considering this technology.

Using an aerial imagery, landscape services can assess the entire terrain and ascertain the needs and budget of the project. Any types of trees and plants can be distinguished using high resolution images. The user can assess the various heights of the structures in various angles and cardinal directions. If you have a clear picture of the area, you offer a more effective field service management.

As this is how landscapers do their business, here is how an aerial view map is used to make business grow and earn more clientele:

  • Efficiently Prospect for New Possibilities

Through a split view, the users can examine a historical capture to a more recent aerial map. For instance, an image taken in March 2017 can be compared to a recent image done in March 2018. Though you may notice a slight difference, but the aerial view map can save some money than travelling to the site. And this can provide more potential opportunities.

  • Create Winning Proposals

Whenever a prospect seeks for a proposal, the landscaper can easily locate the property, provide an estimate, and send the imagery to the customer as a proposal. It’s faster, accurate and more professional that it beats tough competition and wins the job.

  • Field Service Optimization

For example, a commercial developer has requested a landscaping service to complete the job. They have discussed what the structure may be about, while the landscaper needs to determine the appropriate height, width and the type of trees to install. They will also determine the right equipment to use for the job.

  • Maintenance and Customer Satisfaction

The aerial view map of a specific location may have been compared between the year 2016 and 2017. The quality of the lawn may have been different for each year. This will provide idea for the landscaper on how they will do their job to improve the look of the landscapes. This then will make current customers happy with their work.

How The Grand Central Terminal Was Saved From Being Demolished

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Major landmarks are some of the most important elements in the New York City Illustrated Map that is created with attention to detail and flair for creativity. If the illustrated map was created decades ago, it will include old interesting features that are no longer present today. It is only through the map illustration that you will gain an idea on the iconic buildings that have been replaced with newer structures.

One of the cherished structures in New York City is the Grand Central Terminal in Midtown Manhattan that is not only architecturally stunning but used heavily in the region. Every day, more than 750,000 subway and train commuters pass through the terminal. However, a few decades ago, this stunning landmark nearly got torn down because during the mid 70’s developers have made plans to partially demolish the complex to make way for the 53-story tower office.

A group of preservationists that included former First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis fought with the developers. On June 26, 1978 the Supreme Court made a ruling that any proposals that will tear down the terminal will be rejected. This decision set a precedent for all historical landmarks in New York City.

After 10 years of construction and $2 billion in cost in today’s dollars, the Grand Central Terminal was opened for the public in 1913. In the middle of the 70’s Stuart Sanders, an executive of the railroad company that owned Grand Central proposed improvements to make the terminal more profitable. Saunders was known for spearheading the demolition of the original Penn Station located in New York.

The objective of Saunders is to build a 53-story skyscraper to replace one of the Grand Central’s terminal. When the Landmarks Preservation Commission denied the proposal, Saunders sued the city. The preservationists were able to save the Grand Terminal from demolition. Two decades later, the terminal underwent a $113.8 million renovation.

It is very likely for the beauty of the Grand Central Terminal to be captured in the New York City Illustrated Map because it is a popular landmark that will be easily recognized by a visitor to the Big Apple. The illustrator’s creativity will add color and warmth to the hand-drawn map illustration.