Category Archives: Culture

Save Seagrass Campaign In Maldives Gains Momentum

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A holiday at Maldives luxury villas is not complete without experiencing scuba diving. If scuba diving is not your thing, snorkelling a good option because you do not need dive to the deep waters to view the coral reefs. There are schools of colourful fishes that flock together as they float with the tides. Do not miss the opportunity to experience a giant aquarium.

is not complete without experiencing scuba diving. If scuba diving is not your thing, snorkelling a good option because you do not need dive to the deep waters to view the coral reefs. There are schools of colourful fishes that flock together as they float with the tides. Do not miss the opportunity to experience a giant aquarium.

The social media campaign #ProtectMaldivesSeagrass to save seagrass beds in Maldives has gained momentum. According to Blue Marine Foundation and Maldives Underwater Initiative, at least 25% of the resorts in Maldives have joined the campaign. 30 resorts have pledged their support to protect an estimated 830,000sqm of underwater seagrass meadows.

According to the calculations of The Edition, an online news service in Maldives, another 90 resorts need to participate to put an end to the destructive practice of stripping out seagrass in lagoons that are close to  luxury resorts. Some resort managers assume that seagrass spoils the clear picturesque lagoons that tourists usually observe.

Blue Marine Foundation condemns the practice of stripping away natural seagrass beds for cosmetic reasons that is why it initiated the social media campaign. Some resorts have continued with the practice in their lagoons in spite of the number of pledges to end seagrass stripping on the seabed.

Blue Marine Foundation is requesting for the support of the government, resorts, travel organizations and tourists so that they can put an end to seagrass removal. Tourists can help by challenging resorts who still cultivate nude lagoon seabed by stripping away seagrass to make way for selfie photos. Tourists are encouraged to book at resorts that respect marine ecology and protect seagrass.

More than 1,600 persons from the local and international communities’ have registered their support in protecting seagrass in Maldives. Seagrass is very important because it prevents beach erosion, fights climate change, provides food for the turtles and provides a habitat for juvenile coral reef fishes.

A magical experience awaits you at Maldives luxury villas with its exceptional facilities and amenities. The villas are designed for comfort and absolute privacy but to make your stay more memorable, join dolphin tours and watch the dolphins playing in the waters.  

Milwaukee Receives Funding For Early Childhood Education Programs

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Societies all over the world have recognized the value of investing in early quality childhood education because of the spillover effects to the children, their families and society. Children are born with an innate ability to learn and absorb information from the environment. Early childhood education is offered by Star Bright Montessori for children ages 2 to 6 years old to shape their minds and attitudes towards learning.

Next Door and the United Community Center (UCC) in Milwaukee will receive more than $13 million in funding from the Federal Office of Head Start for early childhood education programs. The funds will serve more than 1,200 infants and toddlers that are living in poverty.

According to Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett, the funding is a transformative community asset that will prepare children for kindergarten. It will also support families during the critical years of their children’s life. Younger residents are the target of early childhood initiatives in Milwaukee.

Next Door will serve 749 children while Head Start will serve 629 students’ ages 3 to 5 and 120 student’s ages 6 weeks to 3 years. Next Door president Dr. Tracey Sparrow said that support through high quality early childhood education can prepare children for success in school and close the achievement gap for children who are living in poverty.

Meanwhile, UCC serves a total of 510 children and provides programs for Hispanics and South Side Milwaukee residents ranging from 6 weeks in age to those ready for college. Over the last decade, enrollment rates and college acceptance for UCC alumni has increased from 8% to 96%.

UCC’s investments in early childhood education in Milwaukee has fueled change and laid the foundation for success at the at-risk communities. This exciting step forward ensures that every child regardless of his circumstances at birth can be provided with opportunities to be successful.

It is important for parents to always remember that education is something that no one can take away from their children. High quality early childhood education provided by Star Bright Montessori will support a child’s most critical development years. Education is the ticket that will open more doors for a child to the world.  

WHO Recognizes Traditional Chinese Medicine, And Conservationists Aren’t Happy

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The World Health Organisation recently recognised traditional medicines, like acupuncture in Bankstown, and green groups aren’t pleased.

The World Health Assembly recently wrapped up in Geneva, and had 194 member states adopt the latest iteration of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases (ICD-11), which, in turn, accepts WHO’s recognition of traditional medicines, like acupuncture in Bankstown, as a legitimate diagnostic source.

The ICD defines the world standard for diagnosing, and understanding the causes of diseases, illnesses, and death, as well as the reporting of health conditions internationally. The adoption of the ICD-11 formally recognizes burn-out as a legitimate medical condition, on top of recognising diagnoses provided by traditional medicine for at least 400 medical conditions.

The ICD-11 has a supplementary chapter that talks about disorders and patterns of symptoms that were first noted down in ancient Chinese medicine, now known across the world, but more commonly recognised in China, Korea, and Japan.

The latter, however, was met with some flak, particularly with conservationists, who say that it might have negative implications for wild animal trade.

Panthera, a big cat conservation group hailing from New York, was one of the group’s who took umbrage with the recognition of the WHO. Their Chief Scientist, Dr. John Goodrich says that recognising traditional medicine, which uses wild animal parts, is effective approval from the UN on the overall practice. Failure to consider the repercussions, put effective regulations, and/or condemn the hunting and use of wild animal parts for medicine, he says, is egregiously irresponsible.

The list of wild animals being poached for traditional medicine is huge, with a massive illegal trade market across the world. For example, Singaporean authorities confiscated nearly 13 tonnes of pangolin scales, amounting to about 21,000 of the world’s most poached animal, intended to be used for Chinese medicine.

WHO, have defended their move, saying that including traditional diagnoses and treatment will do much to translate key information across Eastern and Western medicine, recognizing how many people are reliant on traditional, alternative, or complimentary medicine, so much so that it’s not easy to ignore them in global matter of healthcare.

The WHO already have a strategy for the inclusion of traditional medicine in healthcare systems in use across the world, and are looking for ways to have it managed and regulated properly.

 

Thai Culture Caravan Travels Across Europe

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The Thai cultural caravan travelled across Europe earlier in 2018, from May to June, showcasing Thai culture. The caravan, with a mission dubbed “Thailand at the forefront” is part of the country’s efforts to promote its culture in foreign countries via cultural artifacts like embroidery in Thailand, and performances like the masked art of the traditional Thai dance, the khon.

The caravan received full backing from the royal family of Thailand itself, wherein it began its journey to promote Thailand’s culture on a global scale. The roadshow held performances in key venues like the Circulo de Bellas Artes in Spain. Thailand’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs have been running “Thailand at the forefront” since 2015, ever since its official inauguration at the Royal Albert Hall in London as a marker for the 60th birthday of Royal Princess Sirindhorn.

Deputy Director-General of the Department of Information at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ruyaporn Sukontasap, says that their office worked closely with the Ministry of Culture for years in order to prepare the show, which included booking the venue in each country where the performances were held. The Ministry, he says, holds the venue selection process in high regard in order to set a good impression for Thailand abroad.

The performers, due to the limited number of staff for the caravan, were all forced to perform for multiple shows, which was a tough calling, due to the fact that all performances, while carried out in different circumstances, all had to adhere to a high start from the start of the caravan to its conclusion.

Every show starts out with the traditional khon, a masked dance based on the Ramayana epic. The dance details the beginnings of Thotsakan and Rama, their battle and Rama’s subsequent victory. This is then succeeded by Thailand’s regional and combat dances.

As part of the efforts to promote Thai culture, the cloth, previously made in India, was ordered by the Queen to be made by Thais themselves, to showcase textile making and embroidery in Thailand, a notable imperative given that the traditional Thai style needed demanded skills so rare that they’ve almost gone extinct.

Promate Boonyachod, of the Queen’s foundation, said that this decision was also helpful to the poor and young of Thailand, who have been trained in traditional Thai art not only for the country’s heritage, but also as a means for them to make a living.

There were also other cultural promotion activities in Europe, which include a musical-exchange student exchange programme between Thailand’s Mahidol University and the University of Music and Performing Arts in Vienna, with others to follow.