Asteroid Impact Zone Found In Australia Said To Be World’s Largest

Australia – March 24, 2015 – An impact zone was uncovered by a group of Australian scientists and it is believed to be caused by a large meteorite. The discovery is considered as the world’s largest impact zone.

The team that found the impact zone was led by Andrew Glikson who came from the Australian National University or ANU. He said that the two ancient craters that they had found in Central Australia is believed to have been caused by single meteorite that had split into two.

The craters appear to be two large structures that are about 200 km each. If joined together, they would be encompassing about 400 km and there is nothing else like that which can be found on Earth making it the biggest crater ever discovered on this planet.

With the recent discovery, many questions have already been raised particularly as to how it can be connected with a mass extinction theory. The scientist did not deny this and instead acknowledged that it might be related to the 180 km crater that is found in Mexico which is also said to be a catalyst for a mass extinction that killed the dinosaurs millions of years before.

Unfortunately, when the area sizes of the two craters are measured separately, both will be smaller than the two current biggest impact craters in the world which can be found in Sudbury, Ont., which was believed to be caused by a comet and the 300 km wide crater, the current biggest crater, found in Vredefort, South Africa.

Millions of years ago, scientists say that there was an abundance of craters nut due to the waning of time, it was all covered up and hidden through natural processes. But thanks to geothermal research drilling, the secret history that was hidden under a certain area in Australia was finally revealed.

Glikson said that the next step that they should do is to conduct more research. They are hoping that their next research is about deep crust seismic traverses.

Glikson also said that the mantle underneath has been domed up which can be an evidence that something major happened.